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Sunday, June 18, 2017

Pappy's Sunday Supplement #11: Raboy's Flash Gordon

A couple of months ago I showed a post featuring a 1957 Mandrake the Magician continuity. That year my parents subscribed to a Seattle newspaper that featured the major King Features comic strips, including Flash Gordon Sundays by Emmanuel "Mac" Raboy. I don’t remember it specifically, but it was in the time frame I would have been reading it. And looking at Raboy’s artwork has a way of putting me back in touch with those gosh-wow feelings I had 60 years ago, when I would be the first one at the Sunday paper so I could read the comics.

These black line pages, courtesy of xxx Spax, who scanned them, were found on the Internet Archive. The sequence appeared on Sundays between September 8, 1957 and November 24, 1957.













6 comments:

Neil Hansen said...

As usual, your Mac Raboy Flash Gordon entries rock the universe. Many thanks!

Jason Klawon said...

Raboy really was incredible. And the rubbermen are particularly creepy.

Daniel [oeconomist.com] said...

That was certainly action-packed. The story reminds me of the comic-book tales of the early golden age in which a wild series of events take place until a sufficient number of pages have been filled.

Meanwhile, why hadn't Flash and Dale been married yet?

Neil Hansen said...

I just love this Mac Raboy Flash Gordon stuff. Raboy seemed to have a great knack for drawing different thin body types.

Pappy said...

Daniel, I remember my dad's question about couples who "shacked up": "Why buy the cow when the milk is free?"

Oh, but of course Flash and Dale are saving it for marriage. He would be too noble and honorable to take advantage of her lust...errrrr...love for him.

Pappy said...

Neil, Jason, thanks for the notes. I notice neither of you mentioned the actual story, which I feel is inferior to the artwork. Maybe you felt the same way. Daniel alluded to it when he said it reminded him of stories from the Golden Age "in which a wild series of events take place until a sufficient number of pages have been filled."